SERVICES

 
 
 

Alcohol Awareness


Definition of Impairment:
In NJ, a person is guilty of drunk driving if he/she operates a motor vehicle with a Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAC) of .08 percent or greater. BAC refers to the amount of alcohol in your blood. Although the law refers to a 0.10 percent BAC, you can be convicted of driving while under the influence of intoxicating liquor even when your BAC is below 0.10 percent. Consuming even small amounts of alcohol dulls the senses, decreases reaction time, and hampers judgment, vision and alertness. If you consume any amount of alcohol and your driving is affected, you can be convicted of drunk driving. New Law Enacted in 2000:
A new provision (Public Law 99, Chapter 410) was added to New Jersey’s driving under the influence laws and penalties. A parent or guardian who is convicted and who has a minor under age 17 as a passenger in the motor vehicle is also guilty of a disorderly persons offense. In addition to the penalties otherwise prescribed by law, a person shall forfeit the right to operate a motor vehicle for period of not more than six months and shall be ordered to perform community service for a period of not more than 5 days. First Offense A fine of $250-$400*
Imprisonment for up to 30 days*
6 months to 1-year license suspension*
A minimum of 6 hours a day for 2 days detainment in an Intoxicated Driver Resource Center (IDRC), at a charge of $75 a day
An automobile insurance surcharge of $1,000 a year for 3 years
$100 surcharge to be deposited in a drunk driving enforcement fund
A Division of Motor Vehicles restoration fee of $50 and an Intoxicated Driving Program fee of $100
A Violent Crimes Compensation Fund fee of $50
A Safe and Secure Community Program fee of $75
Second Offense A fine of $500-$1,000*
Imprisonment of at least 48 consecutive hours, and up to 90 days*
2 – year license suspension*
48 consecutive hours detainment in a regional Intoxicated Driver Resource Center, at a charge of $100 a day
An automobile insurance surcharge of $1,000 a year for 3 years
$100 surcharge to be deposited in a drunk driving enforcement fund
A Division of Motor Vehicles restoration fee of $50 and an Intoxicated Driving Program fee of $100
A Violent Crimes Compensation Fund fee of $50
A Safe and Secure Community Program fee of $75
Third Offense A fine of $1,000*
Imprisonment of 180 days
10 – year license suspension*
Detainment in an in-patient alcoholism treatment program
Requirements set by the Intoxicated Driving Program/Intoxicated Driver Resource Center
A fee to be paid to the Intoxicated Driver Resource Center dependent upon court sentence An automobile insurance surcharge of $1,500 a year for 3 years
$100 surcharge to be deposited in a drunk driving enforcement fund
A Division of Motor Vehicles restoration fee of $50 and an Intoxicated Driving Program fee of $100 A Violent Crimes Compensation Fund fee of $50
A Safe and Secure Community Program fee of $75
Registration Revocation/Ignition Interlock:
In addition to the penalties listed, judges may order the installation of an ignition interlock device or the revocation of vehicle registration (Public Law 2000, Chapter 83). The ignition interlock device, which measures the driver’s blood alcohol level, may be required for up to three years following license restoration after a DUI conviction. Consequences of Underage Drinking and Driving:
In New Jersey, you must be 21 to purchase, possess or consume alcoholic beverages. Underage drinking is illegal and can have severe consequences for young people who drink and for adults who provide alcoholic beverages to those under 21. If you are under 21 and you buy or drink alcohol in a place with an alcohol beverage license, and you may be fined $500 and lose your license for 6 months. If you do not have your driver’s license, the suspension starts when you are first eligible to receive a license. You may also be required to participate in an alcohol education or treatment program. If you are under 21 and drive with any detectable amount of alcohol in your system (.01 BAC or above), you will be subjected to the following penalties: Loss or postponement of driving privileges for 30 to 90 days 15 to 30 days of community service participation in a program of alcohol education and highway safety
* If occurring within a school zone or school crossing, this penalty is increased under Public Law 99 Chapter 185.




Safe Haven Act


There’s a safe haven for unwanted infants 1-877-839-2339 In New Jersey, the Safe Haven Infant Protection Act allows an individual to give up an unwanted infant with no fear of arrest or prosecution. No names or records are required. The parents-or someone acting on their behalf-can bring a baby less than 30 days old to any hospital emergency room or police station. The Division of Youth and Family Services will immediately take the child into custody and place the infant in a foster or pre-adoptive home. More About Safe Haven…. What is Safe Haven?
It’s a new law: the New Jersey Safe Haven Infant Protection Act. Under this law a person may give up an unwanted infant anonymously. As long as the baby has not been abused, the person may do so without fear of arrest or prosecution. How does it work?
A distressed parent who is unable or unwilling to care for an infant can give up custody of a baby less than 30 days old safely, legally and anonymously. All that is required is that the baby be brought to a hospital emergency room or police station in New Jersey. As long as the child shows no signs of intentional abuse, no name or other information is required. Can only a parent bring in the baby? No. The parent may choose to have someone else bring in the infant. It can be a family member, a friend, a priest or minister, a social worker-practically anyone. Can you help a parent decide where to bring the baby? Yes. The parent can call the Safe Haven Hotline,
1-877-839-2339, and get the address and directions for any hospital or police station in the state. Does a parent have to call before bringing in the baby?
No. A parent can walk in anytime. Does a parent have to tell anything to the people taking the baby?
No. Nothing is required. However, hospital personnel or police will record any information that a parent is willing to share, such as the child’s health, race, date of birth, place of birth or the medical history of the parents. This could be very useful in caring for the child. What happens to the baby?
The child will be examined and given medical treatment, if needed. Then the Division of Youth and Family Services will immediately take custody and place the child in a foster or pre-adoptive home. What happens to the mother?
If the mother brings in the baby, she will be offered medical treatment and social services. She can, of course, refuse if she wishes. Once she has safely turned over the baby, she is free to go. Why is New Jersey doing this?
The purpose of Safe Haven is to protect unwanted babies from being hurt or killed because they were abandoned. You may have heard tragic stories of babies left in dumpsters or public toilets. The parents who committed these acts may have been under severe emotional distress. The mothers may have hidden their pregnancies, fearful of what would happen if their families found out. Because they were afraid and had nowhere to turn for help, they abandoned their babies. Abandoning a baby puts the child in extreme danger. Too often, it results in the child’s death. It is also illegal, with severe consequences. But with Safe Haven, this tragedy doesn’t ever have to happen in New Jersey again. Visit the New Jersey Safe Haven Infant Protection Act Website. Click Here




Car Seat Safety


The Phillipsburg Police Department offers free assistance to anyone who needs help installing a child safety seat. Use Child Safety Seats up to age 8 or 80 pounds. Use Seat Belts age 8 to 18+. This program is a FREE educational service. Officers Sokolowski and Cyphers will teach you how to properly install your child's safety seat. Call 908-835-2002 to make an appointment with Officer Sokolowski or Officer Cyphers on any day between the hours of 8 AM and 6 PM. For more Car Seat Safety information and resources, please visit the following links. Four Steps Flyer
Booster Seat Activity Guide
Child Safety
Child Passenger Safety Growth Chart




Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over


Summertime and the end-of-year holidays are when most Americans gather to enjoy their free time with friends and family. They are also some of the most deadly times on American roads due to impaired driving. That’s why during the summer and the end of the year, a nationwide campaign comprised of thousands of traffic safety partners, join together to protect citizens from this deadly crime. Here in New Jersey, the Division of Highway Traffic Safety utilizes the Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over campaign to achieve its goal: prevention. The Goal is Prevention The key to deterring impaired driving is highly visible enforcement. The research is clear on the affect highly visible enforcement has on deterring impaired driving. Prevention and not arrest is the goal of the campaign. Drivers must perceive that the risk of being caught is too high before their behavior will change. Use the Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over message to convince audiences that the chance of being caught is too high to risk. This message works and has influenced many citizens nationwide not to drink and drive.
Visit the New Jersey Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over Website CLICK HERE




Crash Reports


Phillipsburg Police Department Get your Police Report at crashdocs.org https://www.ecrash.lexisnexis.com CLICK HERE